Mucrackers

Mucrackers
Genres
Rock

“I need something more than mirrors and smoke, ” pleads Rob Carpenter in “Paris To New York,” the centerpiece and emotional climax of The Muckrakers’ new record, The Concorde Fallacy.  It’s been ten years since the Muckrakers laid their first songs down on tape, and while the band’s “propulsive drive and energy” (Paste Magazine), along with its trademark hooks, infectious melodies, and clever lyrics, are still very much in evidence, the songs in this new effort are laced with a recognition of losses survived, coupled with the need to believe in hope, in something beyond smoke and mirrors, both in the music industry and in their personal lives.

The Muckrakers celebrated their ten-year anniversary by losing one band member, nearly losing another in a serious accident, and coping with the collapse of their first record label.  Needless to say, the anniversary party wasn’t a lot of fun.  Combine all that with an exhausting year and a half of traveling across the country in support of 2006’s “Front of the Parade,” and the band had just about had enough of the rock and roll dream.  Named after the economic term for incurred costs that can never be retrieved, The Concorde Fallacy is a direct reflection of the lessons they’ve learned and the lives they’ve lived over the past few years — battle scars that prove that what doesn’t kill you only makes you stronger.  So how do you figure out who you are when the distractions the world has to offer are taken away? Maybe Carpenter says it best in the song  “Seventh Sign”: “When everything is broken, you turn the page on what you’ve learned, and leave the rest behind.”